An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15475 entries, 13329 authors and 1903 subjects. Updated: November 30, 2021

HUNAYN IBN ISHAQ [أبو زيد حنين بن إسحاق العبادي‎; ’Abū Zayd Ḥunayn ibn ’Isḥāq al-‘Ibādī], (Latin: Iohannitius)

11 entries
  • 52

Articella seu opus artis medicinae. Con: Johannitius: Isagoge ad tegni Galeni. Philaretus: De pulsibus; Theophilus Protospatharius: De urinis. Hippocrates: Aphorismi (comm: Galenus; tr: Constantinus Africanus); Prognostica (comm: Galenus); De regimine acutorum morborum (comm: Galenus; tr: Gerardus Cremonensis). Galenus: Liber Tegni, sive Ars medica (comm: Hali; tr: Gerardus Cremonensis).

Padua: Nicolaus Petri, 1476.

A collection of Greek, Roman and Byzantine texts on medicine, written in Latin, that was mainly used as medical school textbook or reference manual between the 13th and 16th centuries. The Articella grew around a synthetic exposition of classical Greek medicine written in Baghdad by the Nestorian Christian Hunayn bin Ishaq (Johannitius), who frequently translated from Greek to Syriac to Arabic. His synthesis was based on Galen's Ars medica (Techne iatrike; Questions on medicine for students) and thus became known in Europe as Isagoge Ioannitii ad tegni Galieni. The collection includes works of Hippocrates, Galen,Theophilus Protospatharius, Johannitius, and the Byzantine physician Philaretus. As a medical library in one convenient volume, which underwent six editions in the 15th century and many other editions in the first half of the 16th century, the work reflects changing attitudes to various ancient texts and translations through the evolution of its contents.  ISTC no. ia01142500. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, BYZANTINE MEDICINE, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 12667

The Aphorisms of Hippocrates, translated into Arabic by Honain ben Ishak, physician to the Caliph Motawukkul. [Edited from two MSS. by J. Tytler, assisted by Mawlavis Sulaymān, Ghulām Makhdūm, and ʿAbd Allāh.].

Calcutta: Education Press, 1832.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12624

Ḥunain ibn Isḥāḳ und seine Schule: Sprach- und literargeschichtliche Untersuchungen zu den arabischen Hippokrates- und Galen-Übersetzungen.

Leiden: Brill, 1913.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 12670

Pseudogaleni in Hippocratis de septimanis commentarium ab Hunaino q. f. Arabice versum, ex codice monacensi primum edidit et Germanice vertit.

Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1914.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 6831

Hunain ibn Ishaq über die syrischen und arabischen Galen-Übersetzungen zum ersten mal Herausgegeben und Überzetzt von G. Bergsträsser.

Abhandlungen für die Kunde des Morgenlandes, 17, No. 2, 1925.

Various writings of Galen survived through Arabic and Syriac translations rather than the original Greek. In the ninth century the Assyrian Christian physician and translator into Arabic and Syriac Hunain ibn Ishaq (Abu Zayd Hunayn ibn Ishaq al-Ibadi), compiled a bibliography of his translations into Arabic. Hunain ibn Ishaq also wrote a letter to one of his patrons discussing his translation process. In February 2015 the Al-Islam.org website stated that Hunain, who was known as Johannitius Onan to Latin readers, "translated 95 works of Galen from Greek to Syriac and 99 into Arabic." This would represented a significant percentage of Galen's output. In 1925 G. Bergsträsser published the Arabic text of Hunain ibn Ishaq's bibliographical work from a manuscript he found in Constantinople. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic
  • 5814.1

The book of the ten treatises on the eye ascribed to Hunain Ibn Is-hâq. The earliest existing systematic text-book of ophthalmology. The Arabic text from the only two known manuscripts, with an English translation and glossary by Max Meyerhof.

Cairo: Government Press, 1928.

The earliest extant systematic textbook of ophthalmology. The Arabs were the first to make a specialty of ophthalmology.



Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, OPHTHALMOLOGY
  • 12671

Neue Materialen zu Hunain Ibn Ishâk’s Galen-Bibliographie. Abhandlungen für die Kunde des Morgenlandes 19.2.

Leipzig: Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft, 1932.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 8232

Hunayn ibn Ishaq's "Questions on medicine for students": Transcription and translation of the oldest extant Syriac version (Vat. Syr. 192). Studi e testi, 459. By E. Jan Wilson and Samuel Dinkha.

Città del Vaticano: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, 2010.

For a critical review of this edition see Grigory Kessel, "Review Essay of Wilson, E.J. and Dinkha, S., Hunayn Ibn Ishaq’s 'Questions on Medicine for Students'. Transcription and Translation of the Oldest Extant Syriac Version (Vat. Syr. 192). Studi e testi, 459. Città del Vaticano: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, 2010," Hugoye: Journal of Syriac Studies, 15 (2010) 375-400.



Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 9314

Galen, De diebus decretoriis, from Greek into Arabic. A critical edition, with translation and commentary of Hunayn ibn Ishāq, Kitāb ayyām al-buhrān, by Glen M. Cooper.

New York: Routledge, 2011.

First printed edition of Hunayn ibn Ishaq's Arabic translation of Galen's Critical Days (De diebus decretoriis), a founding text of astrological medicine, together with the first translation of the text into a modern language.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Medical Astrology, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 12629

The paradigmatic translator and his method: Ḥunayn ibn Isḥāq’s translation of the Hippocratic aphorisms from Greek via Syriac into Arabic. IN: New Horizons in Graeco-Arabica Studies, ed. by D. Gutas, S. Schmidtke, A. Treiger.

Intellectual History of the Islamicate World 3, 158‒187, 2015.

This analysis of the work of the leading medieval Arab translator of Greek texts into Arabic emphasizes that Hunayn ibn Ishāq, a Nestorian Christian, typically prepared an intermediary translation into Syriac, from which the texts were translated into Arabic.



Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 8233

Hunayn ibn Ishāq on his Galen translations: A parallel English-Arabic text edited and translated by John C. Lamoreaux, with an appendix by Grigory Kessel.

Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2016.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine