An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

14810 entries, 12728 authors and 1840 subjects. Updated: September 22, 2020

JUNGIUS, Joachim

2 entries
  • 11882

Doxoscopiae physicae minores, sive isagoge physica doxoscopica. In qua praecipuae opiniones in physica passim receptae breviter quidem, sed accuratissime examinantur. Ex recensione et distinctione M. F. H., cuius annotationes quaedam accedunt.

Hamburg: Johannes Naumann, 1662.

Jungius was the first to appreciate and expand upon the botanical ideas of Cesalpino. In this posthumously published work, edited by his student Martin Fogel, and in his  Isagoge phytoscopica published in 1669, Jungius gave a remarkable account of plant morphology, analyzing plants into a limited number of fundamental parts, and describing these and their relations ton one another with precise and comprehensive terminology. Jungius's methods of morphological analysis were adopted by John Ray and Linnaeus.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Classification / Systemization of Plants
  • 11881

Praecipuae opiniones physicae, passim recetae, breviter quidem sed accuratissime examinate, ex recension & distinctione Martini Fogelii ...cum annotationes quaedam accedunt accessit nunc primum eiusdem auctoris Harmonica & Isagoge phytoscopica.

Hamburg: Johannes Naumann & Stockholm: Gottried Leibezeit, 1679.

Posthumous first publication of Jungius's Isagoge phytoscopia, an expansion or supplement to his system of botanical classification first published in his Doxoscopiae physicae minores (1662). The second edition of the Doxoscopiae was included in this edition, which was edited by Jungius's student, Martin Fogel. Jungius was the first to appreciate and expand upon the botanical ideas of Cesalpino. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Classification / Systemization of Plants